Atopic Dermatitis

 


Atopic Dermatitis

Atopic dermatitis (AD), commonly known as eczema, is a chronic inflammatory skin condition that is marked by itchy, inflamed, and sometimes oozing rashes. This condition can occur at any age but is most commonly seen in children. It is characterized by a cycle of flare-ups, where symptoms worsen, followed by periods of remission when symptoms improve or clear up.

Symptoms of Atopic Dermatitis:
The primary symptom of atopic dermatitis is intense itching, which can be severe enough to interfere with daily activities and sleep. The skin may appear red, dry, scaly, or swollen, and continuous scratching can lead to thickened patches of skin. In infants, the rash often appears on the face, scalp, or limbs and can produce clear fluid. In older children and adults, eczema tends to be located in the creases of the knees, elbows, and parts of the neck, though it can appear anywhere on the body.

Causes and Risk Factors:
The exact cause of atopic dermatitis is unknown, but it is believed to involve a combination of genetic and environmental factors. People with AD often have an overactive immune system that responds aggressively when triggered by allergens or irritants. Genetic factors also play a significant role, particularly mutations in the gene responsible for producing filaggrin, a protein that helps maintain a healthy skin barrier. This defective barrier makes the skin more susceptible to irritants and allergens, which can trigger inflammation.

Triggers and Environmental Factors:
Common triggers for atopic dermatitis flare-ups include harsh soaps or detergents, wool clothing, sweat, stress, and allergens such as pet dander, pollen, and dust mites. Weather conditions like extreme heat or cold can also exacerbate symptoms. Food allergies are another potential trigger, particularly in children, though this is less common.

Management and Treatment:
There is no cure for atopic dermatitis, but treatments and self-care measures can relieve itching and prevent new outbreaks. Moisturizing regularly is crucial for maintaining skin hydration and barrier function. Topical therapies, such as corticosteroids and calcineurin inhibitors, are commonly used to reduce inflammation and control flare-ups. For more severe cases, systemic treatments, including immunomodulators or biologic drugs, may be prescribed. Phototherapy, which involves exposing the skin to controlled amounts of natural sunlight or artificial UV light, is another effective treatment for some people.

Lifestyle modifications, such as using gentle soaps and detergents, wearing soft clothing, and avoiding known allergens, can help manage the condition. Stress management techniques and good skincare routines are also integral parts of managing atopic dermatitis effectively.

Atopic dermatitis (AD), commonly known as eczema, is a chronic inflammatory skin condition that is marked by itchy, inflamed, and sometimes oozing rashes. This condition can occur at any age but is most commonly seen in children. It is characterized by a cycle of flare-ups, where symptoms worsen, followed by periods of remission when symptoms improve or clear up.

Symptoms of Atopic Dermatitis:
The primary symptom of atopic dermatitis is intense itching, which can be severe enough to interfere with daily activities and sleep. The skin may appear red, dry, scaly, or swollen, and continuous scratching can lead to thickened patches of skin. In infants, the rash often appears on the face, scalp, or limbs and can produce clear fluid. In older children and adults, eczema tends to be located in the creases of the knees, elbows, and parts of the neck, though it can appear anywhere on the body.

Causes and Risk Factors:
The exact cause of atopic dermatitis is unknown, but it is believed to involve a combination of genetic and environmental factors. People with AD often have an overactive immune system that responds aggressively when triggered by allergens or irritants. Genetic factors also play a significant role, particularly mutations in the gene responsible for producing filaggrin, a protein that helps maintain a healthy skin barrier. This defective barrier makes the skin more susceptible to irritants and allergens, which can trigger inflammation.

Triggers and Environmental Factors:
Common triggers for atopic dermatitis flare-ups include harsh soaps or detergents, wool clothing, sweat, stress, and allergens such as pet dander, pollen, and dust mites. Weather conditions like extreme heat or cold can also exacerbate symptoms. Food allergies are another potential trigger, particularly in children, though this is less common.

Management and Treatment:
There is no cure for atopic dermatitis, but treatments and self-care measures can relieve itching and prevent new outbreaks. Moisturizing regularly is crucial for maintaining skin hydration and barrier function. Topical therapies, such as corticosteroids and calcineurin inhibitors, are commonly used to reduce inflammation and control flare-ups. For more severe cases, systemic treatments, including immunomodulators or biologic drugs, may be prescribed. Phototherapy, which involves exposing the skin to controlled amounts of natural sunlight or artificial UV light, is another effective treatment for some people.

Lifestyle modifications, such as using gentle soaps and detergents, wearing soft clothing, and avoiding known allergens, can help manage the condition. Stress management techniques and good skincare routines are also integral parts of managing atopic dermatitis effectively.

Get In Contact


Call

1-562-444-8811

Email

Location

4434 Pacific Coast Highway
Long Beach, California 90804

Hours


Monday - Friday

11:00AM - 07:00PM

Saturday - Sunday

11:00AM - 04:00PM

Get In Contact


Call

1-562-444-8811

Email

Location

4434 Pacific Coast Highway
Long Beach, California 90804

Hours


GRAND OPENING

Tuesday, January 2, 2024

Monday - Friday

11:00AM - 07:00PM

Saturday - Sunday

11:00AM - 04:00PM